Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Grapevine Canyon, Nevada - USA

I’m excited to join up again this month with fellow blogger Fiona Ryan's  A-Z Guidebook Travel Linkup over at Tiffin Bite Sized Food Adventures. This travel tale link-up goes from December 15th - December 22th, this time travels with the letter "H".

"G" is for Grapevine Canyon, Nevada USA

Grapevine Canyon, also known as Christmas Tree Pass, has some of the clearest most beautiful petroglyphs I've ever seen. They can be found by following the trail from the parking area, beginning about a 1/2 mile down the trail. The 250+ rock drawings are etched high up on large boulders some as recent as 200 years ago to more than 1000 years ago.

We spent a few hours slowly walking and wandering through the canyon, taking in the petroglyphs and trying to decode their stories. The hike offers tremendous views of the Colorado River Valley, seasonal waterfalls, a gigantic patch of wild grapevines running over a 100 feet long and naturally formed amazing artful geological formations.

Grapevine Canyon lies to the south of Spirit Mountain, the highest peak in the Newberry Mountains. Rising to an elevation of 5,639 feet above sea level, the mountain plays a prominent role in the religion and mythology of the local people. They believe the mountain is the spiritual birthplace of the tribes. Their creation story says that at one time all people belonged to one great tribe, but they began to quarrel. The Creator, Mutavela, settled the dispute by dividing the great land and people into four sections North, South, East, and West.

Spirit Mountain and the surrounding canyons collectively have been named a Traditional Cultural Property and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places because of their significance to the local tribes including the Mohave, Hualapai, Yavapai, Havasupai, Quechan, Pai pai and Maricopa.

While visiting, you are asked to please respect this sacred space. Do not deface the petroglyphs. Do not touch or climb on the rocks or panels.



Look, observe, and imagine, what story do you see?


For more Letter "G" travel stories, visit A-Z Guidebook Linkup. Stay tuned next month for more travel, centering around the Letter "H"!
TIFFIN - bite sized food adventures -

Saturday, December 5, 2015

In My Kitchen - December 2015


It's time for another round of the very cool monthly happening called "In My Kitchen" run by Celia at Fig Jam and Lime Cordial.

So here we go....

This Month in my Kitchen...


Friday, December 4, 2015

Food 'n Film - December 2015

Welcome to Food 'n Film for December!


There is no set theme for December, it is Blogger's choice. You can choose any movie you'd like, with or without a holiday theme just please keep it clean! 

Looking forward to your movie picks, and the recipes that come out out of them! :)


How to take part in the Food 'n Film link-up

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Goan Fish Curry...Our Travels - Goa

Last year at this time, we spent 3 wonderful days in Goa, India. While we were in Goa we decided to visit the famous Shri Shantadurga Temples, Shri Mangeshi temple, and Shri Chandreshwar Bhutnath Temple. We also visited some of the restored plantation houses, beaches, and Goan Red Rice Fields. We opted only to drive by The Basilica of Bom Jesus for a number of reasons, among them because it was the year they display the remains of St. Francis Xavier and there were a lot of pilgrims. We did see some other beautiful colonial churches. Unfortunately on this trip we didn't get to visit the Dudhsagar Waterfall or the Rivona Buddhist Caves but there is always next time.


I won't lie, I was truly excited to try Goan cuisine. Everyone I had spoken to before the trip told me that trying traditional Fish Curry was a must! Goan cuisine is famous for its variety of seafood dishes cooked with coconut, chili, spices, and sometimes vinegar giving the food a very unique flavor.

The Goan food I tried fell into 3 types: Traditional, Portuguese, and Fusion; and it was delicious. Some of my favorites were: Shrimp Curry, Choris pao (Goan Bread stuffed with spiced Pork Sausage), Brinjal Piri Piri, Chicken Xacutti, Rissois de Camarão (Shrimp Dumplings), and of course the Fish curry.

Missing the warm sunshine on this rainy  November day, I tried to replicate that delicious curry I had. This dish has just the right amount of heat, tasty fresh fish cooked in a warmly spiced thick coconut tomato sauce and served with basmati rice.

Here's my recipe for Goan Fish Curry:

Monday, November 16, 2015

Fatorpa, South Goa - India

I’m excited to join up again this month with fellow blogger Fiona Ryan's  A-Z Guidebook Travel Linkup over at Tiffin Bite Sized Food Adventures. This travel tale link-up goes from November 15th - November 22th, this time travels with the letter "F".

"F" is for Fatorpa, Goa, India

For those who don't know, Goa is a small state located in the western region of India bordering the Arabian Sea. Most people hear, Goa, and think beaches and parties, but there is so much more. It is visited by both international and domestic tourists for its beaches, temples, churches, and heritage architecture. It also has great biodiversity due to its location on the Western Ghats.
The impact of Portuguese colonialism is evident to this day; in the architecture, music, colloquial language, bull fighting, and of course religion. Religion is generally a touchy subject especially with a history of violent conversions, and persecution. Most people are unaware of the fact that the Inquisition was dispatched to Goa at the request of St. Francis Xavier, in a 1545 letter to John III of Portugal. 

While we were in Goa we decided to visit the famous Shri Shantadurga Kunkalikarin Temple. Due to the Inquisition, the Goddess's Murti (Icon) was moved to the village of Fatorpa. Stories say, once there was a terrible war between the Gods Shiva and Vishnu and the entire world was distressed. Brahma prayed and begged Shakti (the Divine Mother) to stop the war. The Goddess came and held Shiva by one hand and Vishnu by the other hand and made them make peace. This form of the Goddess is called Shantadurga, 'Shanta' meaning peaceful. Shantadurga is the calm form of the Hindu goddess Durga. In this form, she is also known as the Goddess of Dreams because she visits her followers in dreams. The temple complex is beautiful, the architecture, carved statues on the facade,  and beautifully carved woodwork. It clearly states not to take pictures inside the temple, and I respected that, but I did take photos outside and the surrounding area.

As I slowly walked from one end of the peaceful temple complex to the other, stopping to visiting the smaller shrines...I couldn't help but feel like I was being followed. When I got to the Lord Ganesha shrine at the far end of the complex, I turned around and there she was...

I was being followed by a beautiful butter-blonde cow. I petted her and softly told her how sweet and pretty she was, gave her some leaves to eat, and thought she would go on her way. But no! She kept following, and when I got to the car to leave she tried to come with, sticking her head in the window. Our driver and other devotees watched, and laughed as she tried to stick herself in the car. One devotee shouted to me, not to worry that it was a good sign animals are attracted to a good heart. As it was time to go, we had to slowly and carefully drive past her. She followed us to the main gate of the temple, and watched with her big brown eyes as we continued our journey.

Fatorpa, South Goa - India





For more Letter "F" travel stories, visit A-Z Guidebook Linkup. Stay tuned next month for more travel, centering around the Letter "G"!
TIFFIN - bite sized food adventures -

Saturday, November 14, 2015

Spiced Peanut Brittle w/ Cocoa Nibs

Food 'n Film "The Princess Bride" - Peanut Brittle

I remember when we got our first VCR in the late '80s, and I definitely remember our very first VHS. Dad came home with this gray rectangle and on the cover were blue clouds, a castle, and two people...scrawled across the top was the title...."The Princess Bride." Now, there are films we identify with during different stages of our lives, and some that stay with us through out…this is the latter.  The great story - Fencing, fighting, torture, revenge, giants, monsters, chases, escapes, true love, miracles...  The quotable lines - "Inconceivable!" "As You Wish", "Hello, My Name is Inigo Montoya..."  The lovable characters played by some truly great actors, all these things have left their mark. I love this movie, the book, the soundtrack…love it! My sister, my brother and I can all recite the movie dialogue almost word for word and always wait for the song, "Storybook Love" played at the credits. It is a cherished part of our childhood.

It’s funny how our four main characters: Buttercup, Westley, Inigo, Fezzik, have appealed to me in different ways throughout my life. 

Monday, November 9, 2015

Rutgers Entrepreneurship Ag Program: Responding to Ethnic Palates!

Rutgers Vegetable Research Farm 3 signpost at the entrance of the research farm where the EAP plots are located at #67 Ryders Lane, East Brunswick, NJ

As a kid growing up in Manhattan I was surrounded by an interesting and eclectic mix of people, languages, cultures, and cuisines. Just on our apartment floor alone we had everything ranging from Taiwanese and Russian, to Polish and Italian. Chef Ed Lee describes this experience really well in “Mind of a Chef” - Season 3, Episode 1 ‘Origin.' 

But once we moved out to Central NJ things changed. Since we now had a backyard, as I mentioned before, my parents began growing a few vegetable, staples like lettuce, cilantro, tomatoes, and zucchini. But it also meant that vegetables we had easy access to in the city, were unheard of in the suburbs; Avocado, Cilantro, Yuca, Banana Leaves, Chayote, Papaya, Mamey, Plantains and God-forbid Platano-Maduros just to name a few. The only place we could get some of these items was the one very, small Chinese shop in town. This meant if we went to the city, we’d come back with goodies; family would also oblige us when they came to visit.

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Food 'n Film - November 2015




Welcome to Food 'n Film for November!


There is no set theme for November, it is Blogger's choice. Looking forward to your movie picks, and the recipes that come out out of them! :)

How to take part in the Food 'n Film link-up

Monday, November 2, 2015

In My Kitchen - November 2015


It's time for another round of the very cool monthly happening called "In My Kitchen" run by Celia at Fig Jam and Lime Cordial.

So here we go....

This Month in my Kitchen...


Monday, October 26, 2015

Baked Spiced Pumpkin Donuts


The seasons have changed in the Northern Hemisphere, Days are getting colder, Nights are getting longer, Trees are changing color and Halloween is right around the corner. With that comes the commercial onslaught of Pumpkins...and Pumpkin Spiced Everything! I am a fan of pumpkin...real pumpkin, and the spices usually used to cook pumpkins, so I thought... Hey why not add my own recipe!

These Baked Spiced Pumpkin donuts are soft and fluffy, and the Vanilla Glaze just gives them the right amount of sweetness! :)

Here's my recipe for Baked Spiced Pumpkin Donuts:

Friday, October 16, 2015

Ellis Island, USA

I’m excited to join up again this month with fellow blogger Fiona Ryan's  A-Z Guidebook Travel Linkup over at Tiffin Bite Sized Adventures. This travel tale link-up goes from October 15th - October 22th, this time travels with the letter "E".

"E" is for Ellis Island, NY but mostly NJ, USA. Ellis Island was the gateway for millions of immigrants to the United States and was the nation's busiest immigrant inspection station from 1892 until 1954. Today, over 100 million Americans, can trace their ancestry to the immigrants who first arrived in America at Ellis Island. 

You can reach the island via a short Ferry ride from NY or Liberty State Park NJ. We went last Autumn with my Parents, my Abuela, and my Tío (Grandma's brother), every one of us having experienced different aspects of the American immigrant experience. I'm 1st generation American on my Mother's side and 2nd on my Father's. It was quite an emotional ferry ride, slow and steady up to that red beautiful building in the shadow of Lady Liberty. 

I suggest taking a headset and a map for a self tour. As you walk from room to room, and hear and read stories of immigrants who've passed through these walls you'll encounter a range of emotions. Moving shoulder to shoulder with numerous other visitors from one room to another, you'll start to experience what it must have felt like for those new arrivals. Immigrants who were approved and passed the health inspection spent only a few hours there. They were asked 29 questions including name, occupation, and the amount of money carried. It was important to the government that they could support themselves and have money to get started, at least between $18-$25. Only about 2% were denied admission and sent back to their countries of origin for reasons ranging from contagious disease, and criminal background, to insanity.

I'll leave you with one of my favorite recollections from a young lady, circa 1917. She was being asked questions on the proper way to clean stairs by the doctors to determine her mental fitness and her capacity for finding a job. Her priceless retort, "I didn't came all this way to clean stairs." Needless to say she was allowed to enter and started her new life.


Ellis Island - USA



For more Letter "E" travel stories, visit A-Z Guidebook LinkupStay tuned next month for more travel, centering around the Letter "F"!

TIFFIN - bite sized food adventures -

Saturday, October 10, 2015

Crispy Okra Salad w/ Shrimp




We've had a lot of okra this summer. Between what we grew in our backyard and the generous offerings from work (Perks of working in Plant Bio! :))

Okra, also known as Ladies' finger or Bhindi, is a member of the mallow family and is related to those beautiful tropical Hibiscus flowers. It is most often associated State -side with the South, Louisiana and Gumbo; a reflection of the area's African, and French culinary influences. They are high in fiber, vitamin C, and is also a good source of calcium and potassium.
For most people Okra is slimy and unpleasant, but just like any other vegetable you need to learn how to cook with it before you can enjoy it. This thin sliced salad gives a different take on Okra, quickly frying it to make it crispy and crunchy, but retaining its unique flavor. Thinly sliced crisp red onions, bright red peppers, and sweet carrots are mixed with fresh cilantro, tangy lime juice, and homemade Cajun spice mix, then topped with crispy fried okra. It's a great light and tangy salad. Adding cooked shrimp to the mix makes it more of a fusion meal, or as I call it, Cajun ceviche.
Here is my recipe for Crispy Okra Salad:

Sunday, October 4, 2015

Food 'n Film - New Blogging Challenge - October 2015



"Tombstone" - Mustache Sugar Cookies

For the inaugural Food 'n Film post I thought long and hard as to which movie to choose. It all came down to timing, and a few signs. I've always loved Westerns and I was thinking to start with one, while mulling it over I came across these really cool mustache cookie cutters and the light bulb went off. That's when I realized most people would see those cookie cutters and think ironic hipsters instead of what I saw...


In My Kitchen - October 2015


It's time for another round of the very cool monthly happening called "In My Kitchen" run by Celia at Fig Jam and Lime Cordial. I can't believe it's already been over a year since joining in the fun!

So here we go....

This Month in my Kitchen...

Friday, September 25, 2015

Eggplant Rollatini


Eggplant Flower 
The eggplant is from the Solanceae family of plants, meaning it is related to Tomatoes and Potatoes as well as Tobacco and the group of flowering plants known as the Nightshades. Fun fact: Technically it is a berry, because the fruit contains so many small, soft seeds. Those seeds tend to have a very bitter taste which is because, as a relative of tobacco, they contain small amounts of nicotine. But don't worry, the nicotine content of 20 lbs of eggplants is about the same as that of one cigarette.
Eggplants in our Garden


We've grown 3 types of eggplants this year, Italian Black Beauty, Patio Baby, and Japanese Ichiban Eggplants. And lucky for us we've had a bumper crop. They are a family favorite veggie and so very versatile. My introduction to eggplant was my Mom's Eggplant Parmesan. She makes a great tasty, hearty, never bitter, Eggplant Parmesan...Kishore loved it the minute he tried it. He was surprised it was eggplant because he was use to the smaller egg shaped Indian eggplants.


I like to try to use as much of our garden produce in a single meal as possible, and Eggplant Rollatini seemed the way to go. It used Eggplant, Garlic, Swiss Chard, Basil, Tomatoes,  Marjoram, and Oregano. The herby cheese and chard mix is stuffed in grilled eggplant, then baked in a tasty marinara sauce and topped with some toasted mozzarella. This tasty Eggplant Rollatini is a great hearty meal as we transition from Summer to Autumn.

Here is my recipe for Eggplant Rollatini with Swiss Chard stuffing:

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

I’m excited to join up again this month with fellow blogger Fiona Ryan's  A-Z Guidebook Travel Linkup over at Tiffin Bite Sized Food Adventures. This travel tale link-up goes from September 15th - September 22th, this time travels with the letter "D".

"D" is for Deira, Dubai, UAE. 

Specifically the Covered Dubai Spice Souk or the Old Souk, which is a traditional market located in an area of Dubai called Deira - Al Ras. You can get to it via Wooden Water Taxi (Abra) on Dubai Creek, Stop 20, Deira Old Souq. As you get closer to the cooler, darkened, wooden carved entrance the mixed warm enticing aromas of fragrances and spices hits you. As your eyes adjust to the darkness, you are greeted to piles of dried spices, herbs,  fruits, flowers, and resins; and eager shop owners encouraging you to check out their many wares. 
Store stalls in the Spice Souk sell a wide variety of fragrances, resins, and spices used in Arabic and South Asian food; from Frankincense and Shisha to Salab and Lemon Omani. In addition to herbs and spices; household goods such as textiles, incense, rugs and handicrafts are also sold. In recent years, the number of stores trading spices in the Souk have been reduced due to larger supermarkets.

Overall we had a wonderful time exploring the Souk and came home with a great experience and some lovely spices and  resins. I would highly recommend going to visit if you have the chance.

Two things to be aware of:
  • Most of the trading occurs through bargaining. Be prepared and don't feel bad about doing it, the only things I would not suggest bargaining about are food and religious materials. For example you know something is worth $5, but the shopkeeper wants $10, you say you'll pay $3. When he says no, you ask him how much...
    • He says, "Lowest, $7."  You say, "No, $4." 
    • He says, "No, $7. I have children to feed."  You say, "Never mind I'm leaving."
    • He says, "Ok, ok how about $6?"  You say, "$5 and we have a deal." 
    • He says, "Ok, $5?"  You say, "Thank you." (Making sure to take only that much cash to pay!)
  • Know your spices and know your prices!!! One lady thought she was getting a great deal buying a special 'exotic variety of Filipino Saffron' called "Kasubha", in reality she was about to buy a load of fake saffron called safflower. It looks similar when dry in the package, but smells and tastes different and doesn't cost anywhere near the price of real Saffron. In the US, 6 oz of Kasha costs $24; while Real Saffron costs $45 for 1/2 oz!!!

Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates





















You can read more about our trip here: Our Travels - Dubai.

For more Letter "D" travel stories, visit A-Z Guidebook Linkup. Stay tuned next month for more travel, centering around the Letter "E"!

TIFFIN - bite sized food adventures -

Sunday, September 13, 2015

3 year Blog Anniversary!!!

September is my 3 year Blog Anniversary!!! 


I know most bloggers celebrate their first but I didn't feel comfortable doing that. Besides I read the statistics, most blogs don't last past the 1-2 year mark so I was afraid of celebrating too soon.

Besides 3 is suppose to be a magic number...
To quote Schoolhouse Rock...
"Yes it is, it's a magic number. Somewhere in the ancient, mystic trinity
You get three as a magic number. 
The past and the present and the future,
Faith and hope and charity, The heart and the brain and the body
Give you three. That's a magic number."

 In the last few years I've learned a lot of things, and connected with some really interesting people. The blogosphere can be uplifting and cruel at the same time. I have met some lovely and interesting people, and others whose goal in life is to bully and troll; no different then the real world. 
I want to sincerely thank all those Readers, Commenters, and Sharers, who have encouraged me via their visits, likes, comments, shares, etc.

And to keep in the spirit of three I wanted to list 3 things the past, the present, and the future:

1. What I've learned - 
  • Blogging has made it abundantly clear that I do not fit into any one prescribed box. I have a wide array of ever growing interests; I am not only one thing and my blog reflects that. I hope that I can encourage more people to look outside these boxes, and experiment and try new things. 
2. Where I am now - 
  • I'm having fun sharing gardening tips, recipes, how-to's, and travel stories and photos. I have big plans to revamp the blog but I've been implementing them slowly. Next month, I will start a monthly linkup which I hope you all will join. 
3. Where the future takes us -
  • Hopefully it will take us full steam ahead! But regarding specifics I leave you with the words of George Harrison, "If you don't know where you're going, any road will take you there." And I'm truly looking forward to the adventure!

Thanks Again Everyone and I'm looking forward to celebrating more anniversaries down the line! :)

Sunday, September 6, 2015

In My Kitchen - September 2015


It's time for another round of the very cool monthly happening called "In My Kitchen" run by Celia at Fig Jam and Lime Cordial. I can't believe it's already been over a year since joining in the fun!

So here we go....

This Month in my Kitchen...


Tuesday, August 25, 2015

How to Tuesday - Pickled Chard Stems

Growing your own vegetables makes you want to use as much of what you grow as possible. Kishore and I were both brought up with the principle of waste not, want not and given all the time, energy, and work we put into the kitchen garden it only follows that we would put that into practice.
Most people eat the green leafy part of Swiss Chard and cast away the fleshy ribs. Little did they know the treasure they were throwing away. I've always liked these fleshy, juicy ribs in salads and thought they would taste great pickled. When I stumbled upon a recipe in my antique cookbook for pickled mustard, I thought I'd adjust it for the Chard and was pleasantly surprised with  the results. You can use any variety of Chard, we grow Bright Lights Swiss Chard, so it has bold bright beautiful colors which add a lovely color to the pickle juice as time goes by.

This recipe is for 2 pints of juicy, yet tangy spiced stems, perfect for a Farmer's Market Bunch.

Here's my recipe for Pickled Chard Stems:

Saturday, August 22, 2015

Beets and Duck Eggs on Toast



I was very lucky earlier this week to come across some Fresh Duck Eggs!
Now, I know most people may not be familiar with them, since they aren't sold in the corner stores so I'll give a brief rundown.

On the outside:

Duck eggs are bigger than chicken eggs, and have a significantly thicker shell. This can make them a little harder to crack, but that also makes them more resilient to market bag packing and gives them a longer shelf life.

On the insides:
L: Duck Yolk R: Chicken Yolk

Duck yolk is much bigger than a chicken yolk. It's higher in protein and has higher omega-3s. Besides that, duck eggs are nutritional similar to chicken eggs. 

And the most important part...They are delicious! 
Duck eggs are flavorful in their own right, and that has a lot to do with their diet. Ducks prefer to eat a variety of high-protein insects, over plants and eat little to no feed, and that impacts the flavor of their eggs significantly.
You can cook duck eggs pretty much the same way as a chicken egg; but you need to factor in a few things: 1- the thicker shell means longer boiling, 2- A higher fat content makes them creamier and richer. 

They add a great depth of flavor to a dish and so I decided to pair them with two great buys from yesterday's farmers market beautiful beets and a very rustic farmhouse loaf of multigrain sourdough.

This morning was beautifully sunny, so we  decided to have a our Saturday Breakfast in our garden with the birds. This is great as an appetizer, brunch, or as a light meal. The earthy toast, topped with tangy, dill marinated beets, and creamy flavorful soft boiled duck eggs was a great way to start the weekend.

Here is my recipe for Beets and Duck Eggs on Toast:

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Chloride, Arizona - USA

I’m excited to join up again this month with fellow blogger Fiona Ryan's  A-Z Guidebook Travel Linkup over at Tiffin Sized Bites. This travel tale link-up goes from August 15th - August 22th, this time travels with the letter "C".

"C" is for Chloride, Arizona. Chloride is considered an almost ghost town, with a population of ~200. It was silver mining camp founded 1863 near the Cerbat Mountains and is the oldest continuously inhabited mining town in Arizona.

An interesting thing waits in the mountains about a mile outside of Chloride proper. In 1966, artist Roy Purcell took to the Cerbat Mountains and painted "The Journey," a 2000-square-foot set of murals on rock face. His work was is in the abstract Modernism tradition, and helped launch his professional career.

The vivid colors Purcell used to paint his murals have withstood harsh desert weather for nearly four decades and just recently in 2006 were repainted. They stand as an interesting complement and contrast to the Petroglyphs of Native American artists that have withstood centuries in these beautiful mountains.


Chloride, Arizona - USA




For more Letter "C" travel stories, visit A-Z Guidebook LinkupStay tuned next month for more travel, centering around the Letter "D"!

TIFFIN - bite sized food adventures -

Sunday, August 9, 2015

In My Kitchen - August 2015


It's time for another round of the very cool monthly happening called "In My Kitchen" run by Celia at Fig Jam and Lime Cordial. I can't believe it's already been over a year since joining in the fun!

So here we go....

This Month in my Kitchen...


Friday, July 31, 2015

Black Bean and Cornmeal Patties



I've always loved Black Beans, they remind me of my Abuela's kitchen and her cooking. She makes the most deliciously flavorful Black Beans, whether it is Soup or Rice and Beans they are always tasty and are a staple at at her table. It's been a little too hot lately for soup, and  I wanted to shake things up a bit by using those ingredients a different way.

Black Beans team up with Fresh Cilantro, Green Onions, Earthy Cornmeal and a touch of Hot Sauce and Spice for this tasty dish. The best way to describe the taste is the flavors of a fresh Homemade Corn Tortilla filled with Black Beans and fresh Salsa wrapped into one little mouth-watering package served with a side of Spicy Crema. These Black Bean patties are great as a snack, side dish, or Veggie Option to a Hamburger.

Here is my recipe for Tasty Black Bean and Cornmeal Patties:

Makes 10-12

Ingredients:
1 Cup Yellow Cornmeal
1- 16oz Can Black Beans, Drained
2 Stalks Green Onions, sliced
1/2 cup Cilantro, chopped
1 - 2 Tblsp Hot Sauce
1 tsp Minced Garlic
1 tsp Fresh Ground Black Pepper
1 tsp Ground Cumin
1/2 tsp Oregano
1 tsp Salt
1/2 Cup Vegetable Stock
Vegetable Oil

Directions:

Spicy Sour Cream (Spicy Crema):
1/4 Cup Sour Cream, 1/4 tsp Dried Minced Onion, 1/4 tsp Garlic Powder, 1 Tblsp Water,
1-2 tsp Hot Sauce, Pinch of Salt & Pepper
1. Mix all the listed ingredients till smooth, refrigerate until ready to use.

Black Bean and Cornmeal Patties:
1. In  a saucepan bring the Vegetable Stock to a boil, then add the cornmeal. Stir continuously till thickened, reduce heat and cook for another 5 minutes uncovered. Remove from stove and place in a bowl.

2. To the cooked cornmeal add the black beans, onions, cilantro, garlic, hot sauce, and spices. Mix throughly.


3. Pour oil about 1/2" deep into a frying pan, and heat to medium hot.

4. While the oil is heating, with slightly damp hands start forming the patties. Carefully place them in the oil, and cook till golden brown on both sides.





5. Drain on paper towels.

Serve Hot with Spicy Sour Cream Sauce.


Enjoy!

I have added this to My Legume Love Affair #85, hosted by Jagruti at Jagruti's Cooking Odyssey and Lisa's Vegetarian Kitchen and Susan's The Well Seasoned Cook.
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